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1967

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The Famous L88

1967.jpg

Wheel Base: 98"
Length: 14' 8"
Width: 5' 10"
Weight: 3145 lbs
Trans: 2 Speed  Auto
   or 3 Speed Manual
   or 4 Speed Manual
Brakes: 11.75" Disk
 
Engines
Base: 327ci V8 w/ 300hp
Optional: 327ci V8 w/ 350hp
Optional: 427ci V8 w/ 390hp
Optional: 427ci V8 w/ 400hp
Optional: 427ci V8 w/ 435hp
Optional: 427ci V8 w/ 430hp (probably true 550hp)

1967 was the last year of the "mid year" C2 Corvettes, as the 1963 through 1967 models were known. The styling that shook the world in 1963 had proved itself everywhere, including critical praise and a sales volume that would not quit. Every model year saw a sales increase through 1966; Things cooled down for 1967 in part because a new body style would be introduced in 1968.

For all cars, 1967 would be a pivotal year. Safety and smog requirements would become the law starting in 1968 and the new regulations would affect performance cars profoundly.

The popular L71 427 cu. in. motor.  Note the use of shielded spark plug wires, used to reduce radio static. Resistive spark plugs were commonly used in most cars but they degraded engine performance so the more expensive shielding was used. Radio static was a common Corvette problem as the fiberglass body did not provide electrical shielding of a conventional steel body. Right: the 3 x 2 configuration (three 2 bbl. carburetors) was proudly announced on the triangular air filter housing.

Big blocks continued to be the way to go for Corvette purchasers in 1967; of the five engine options available, four were 427 cu. in. displacement. Multiple carburetors were the secret on the L68 (400 hp) and L71 (435 hp) motors. They had been used with great success in the Pontiac GTO but a GM corporate ban caused them to disappear from the Pontiac. Corvette was exempted however and three 2 bbl. Holly carburetors (below) were mounted on top of a aluminum manifold. The center carb was used in normal operation; above 2000 RPM the front and rear units kicked in. Good fuel economy was part of the bargain since only one carburetor was in use most of the time.

The L71 was a very popular engine option and for good reason. Included was four bolt mains, a very aggressive cam rubbing on solid lifters, big valve heads and a transistorized ignition system.

The "Stinger" hood - featured only on 1967 big block equipped 'vettes - is a Corvette classic. Its effect is to somehow magically cause wallets to open up very wide whenever one is offered for sale. They were usually painted in contrasting colors at the factory.

Back-up illumination was located just above the rear license plate for 1967 only.  A Corvette equipped with an automatic transmission was a bit of a rarity in 1967 and most of the other mid-year models. Only about 10% were so equipped, which says a lot about the buyers and their cars.

There were some changes in the 1967 Corvette interior, including the movement of the emergency brake to the center console between the passengers. Previously it was located under the dashboard and accessible only to the driver. The change moved the Corvette towards its sports car intentions.

Other safety related changes appeared, including an energy absorbing steering column, a thicker dash pad, and mushroom shaped knobs. A dual circuit brake master cylinder was standard in all Corvettes and included a warning light if one of the circuits failed. Other changes included a shatter resistant vinyl padded rear view mirror with a break-away mount, four way emergency flashers and a "freeway lane change" function on the directional signal switch. Headrests (RPO A82, $42.15) were an option. Most of the changes would soon become law, but the Corvette jumped the gun a bit.

The front fender ducting changed to a "gill" arrangement exclusively for 1967. The aluminum wheels lost their knock-off styled ears, a concession to upcoming safety regulations.

The L88 427 V8 had an advertized HP rating of 430hp but that wasn't actualy true.  The real horsepower was closer to 550hp.   This engine was built to offer the ultimate in big block performence.  The carburetor was a monster Holley R3418A atop a cast aluminum intake manifold.  The fuel had a minimum 103 research octane.  No pollution control was fitted.  Induction was through a special cold air hood, wich took high pressure air from the windshield base, and filtered it through a hood mounted filter.   A special race-only, side mounted exhaust was offered and other heavy duty options were required.   Only 20 L88 427 Corvettes were ever built in 1967, making it one of the most rare Corvettes of all time.

1967 Corvette Brochure

1967 Corvette Options List

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